Women in Welding

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Outsource Institute has two questions for our readers to ponder:

1. Are you a female?
2. Have you ever considered a career in welding?

Welding is not a new employment prospect for women, in fact women have worked in shipyards and factories welding since WWII, when many men had to leave their welding jobs to serve overseas. As Welding is one of Outsource Institute’s most popular courses, we were interested to learn of its opportunities for women.

Michael Pratt, a Welding Trainer previously employed at Outsource Institute, reflected upon his experience of working with female welders, “I have had the opportunity to work with several female welders over the years and these women naturally paid attention to detail, had a steady arm and were meticulous in their work. They were able to demonstrate more patience, and great motor skills, often making them some of the best welders in the industry, that I have come across.”

WHY SHOULD WOMEN CONSIDER A CAREER IN WELDING?

Welding is often described as more of an art than just merely a craft.

Welding is ever-changing. It is adaptive, dynamic, and challenging. It applies new knowledge and scientific principles, and it is constantly expanding its frontiers.

Welding pays well, offers plenty of room for advancement, and obliterates the glass ceiling that many women face in the workplace.

The need for welders is not expected to decrease in the near future, in fact, experts predict a large shortage of capable manufacturing workers in the next few years.

Although automation in some areas is possible, demand for welders remains high demand as they are required to adjust welds and operate welding machinery.

Welding as a lifetime career prospect is stable and secure.

WHAT COURSES DO OUTSOURCE INSTITUTE OFFER IN WELDING?

MEM40119 CERTIFICATE IV IN ENGINEERING (WELDING) or
MEM40105 CERTIFICATE IV IN ENGINEERING (WELDING)

This qualification has been designed for existing engineering tradespersons along with apprentices who choose to study at a higher level. The job role involves the application of additional skills in the learner’s trade or cross skills from other trades. Job roles may include the design, assembly, manufacture, installation, modification, testing, fault finding, commissioning, maintenance, and service of equipment and machinery, equipment, and joining techniques. Machinery and equipment can include fluid power systems, stationary and mobile equipment, instruments, refrigeration, and the use of computer-controlled machine tools.

If a career in welding is something you are considering we would encourage you to visit our course page for further information or contact one of our friendly Training and Development Specialists on 1300 136 904 for an obligation free conversation.